Tag Archive for: real estate funding

Sounds like a gimmick, but it’s true – here’s how to get full financing on any real estate deal.

There’s a trick large developers use to finance their real estate projects all the way to 100%. Does the same strategy work on your real estate investing scale?

Sounds like a pipe dream, especially in a market where the Fed keeps tightening lenders’ funds.

Let’s go over how it’s actually possible. We’ll call the funding you need for your project your “money bucket.” We’ll show you how to fill that bucket with different funding sources just like they do on the biggest development projects.

The Money Buckets: How Financing Real Estate Works

Your money bucket is empty at the start of a project. Its size is determined by the costs. For successful investments, you need to fill up the bucket with money.

The financial term for filling the bucket is a “capital stack.” It’s when an investor stacks one loan on top of another until an entire project is funded to 100%. Let’s go over how to put your capital stack, or “money bucket” together.

How Big Is Your Bucket?

If we’re just starting a deal, then our money bucket is empty. How big is it? AKA, what costs do we need to cover?

There are four main costs in real estate investing:

  • Purchase price
  • Rehab
  • Carry costs
  • Interest payments and other miscellaneous

Financing Real Estate to Fill Your Money Bucket 

We need to see if we can fill our money bucket, so we start looking for other buckets of money to throw in. We begin with the loan from our primary lender.

In a typical market, a real estate investment lender (like hard money) would pay 75% of the ARV of the property. That 75% would cover 90% of the purchase price and 100% of the rehab costs.

With tightened money, however, the underwriting guidelines for this bucket have changed. Almost universally, you’ll see these same lenders only offering 70% of the ARV. This adds up to 80% on the purchase and 100% on the rehab. You’re getting less financing for real estate projects, so you’ll have to bring in more money out-of-pocket for this deal.

That’s not an insignificant amount of money, either. Down payments now, in early 2023, are sometimes double what they were six months ago.

Our money bucket might be around 80-90% full with our lender’s loan. But we have to get it filled to 100% somehow. Where do the funds come from so you can keep buying good properties when deals are getting great?

4 Money Buckets to Use When Financing Real Estate

There are 4 other buckets of money you might be able to dip into to complete your capital stack:

  1. Secured lines of credit
  2. Secured gap funding
  3. Unsecured lines of credit
  4. OPM

Word of Warning Financing Real Estate with Credit

Before we get into these 4 extra money buckets, we want to make one thing clear about financing: You have to pay credit sources back.

Treat your lines of credit like lenders that need to be paid in full at the end of your project. Treat your business like a business. What’s left over after you pay off your credit is the profit you get to keep for your project.

If you turn the financing for real estate into a personal piggy bank, these sources will only drain your bucket instead of filling it. Poor credit management will tank your investment business.

1. Secured Lines of Credit

In volatile markets, the most common starting place to complete your capital stack is secured lines of credit.

The most common secured line of credit is a HELOC. You can take out a HELOC on your personal home, or any of your investment properties.

A HELOC just takes good credit, good income, and owning a piece of real estate. If you meet these criteria, then you can take money from this credit line and drop it into the money bucket for your current project.

2. Secured Gap Funding

Another important bucket for financing real estate is secured gap funding from a private money lender (like The Cash Flow Company).

This is a good option if you:

  • Don’t have the income to qualify for a loan.
  • Don’t have the equity to qualify for a HELOC.
  • But do have a real estate property.

This funding can help cover the down payment, carry costs, or part of the rehab using another property to secure the loan.

3. Unsecured Lines of Credit

The appeal of a 0% line of credit is:

  • You can use it for a down payment or rehab costs.
  • Other types of credit can have rates up to 19-29%. Zero percent is a major advantage.
  • The right credit cards can be a great stepping stone to get your first few deals done so you can move on to better forms of financing.

The danger of unsecured credit is:

  • The temptation to use it outside of business expenses.
  • If you don’t pay them off at the end of the project, then you get into trouble fast.

4. Real OPM

Other People’s Money is one of the most powerful ways to boost your real estate career.

OPM is money from ordinary people. The biggest real estate investors always have multiple regular people who loan them money for projects. Borrowing in this way is the fastest, easiest, and cheapest way to fill your money bucket.

It may seem impossible to find someone who wants to give you money. But the reality is: people who have cash aren’t getting good returns from banks; they’ll get higher secured returns lending to you.

Fill Your Money Bucket with 100% Financing on Real Estate Deals

The market has changed. Your primary loan will leave your money bucket emptier. It takes a little more creativity to fill it up.

The bigger the pool of money you have in any market, the more options you’ll have. Financing makes your real estate investing easier and more profitable.

Want to build your capital stack? We have a free download about money buckets.

If you have any questions about a deal, getting funding, or setting up OPM, email us at Info@TheCashFlowCompany.com.

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Here’s how to use both hard money and bank funding to maximize your cash flow.

You can’t get by on just hard money or banks alone. Hard money and bank funding both have their place in your real estate portfolio.

Here’s an overview of the advantages of both types of leverage.

Speed with Hard Money

What if you have a great deal, but you’re required to close in 5-7 days? In that case, you need hard money.

You’ll meet sellers in your real estate career who just don’t want an extended closing. These sellers would rather you close quickly – and they’ll give you a better deal on the price if you can do it. Sometimes, taking too long to secure your financing can get you kicked out of a deal.

You can call your hard money lender and get leverage fast. There’s no hold-up for an appraisal or trudging through a lengthy underwriting process. Hard money is specifically designed for real estate investing.

Even seasoned real estate investors, who do dozens of deals every year, still require hard money from time to time. Every investor runs into deals where they need to close quickly. Whether it’s because your bank won’t be ready in time, you’ve maxed out your line with your hedge fund, or some other unexpected circumstance, you need a hard money lender in your portfolio for speed.

Fast closing can capture a lot of equity on a property. Despite hard money being one of the most expensive forms of leverage, purchase price savings on a quick close can far outweigh the cost of the loan.

Pricing with Banks

If hard money is for speed, then banks are for price.

Finding a bank that loves working with real estate investors is a valuable weapon. If you can build a relationship with the right bank, you can get a better rate and a better closing cost.

Some circumstances when you’d benefit from getting your leverage from a bank include:

  • Whenever you have the time to close. If you can afford to wait for appraisals and underwriting, your loan costs will be much cheaper.
  • If the rehab work will take longer than 6-9 months. When you close on a flip with hard money, you need to complete construction on the property within a month or two. If you use a bank loan, you can afford to spend longer fixing up the house.
  • Any time you want more cash in your pocket! Banks have half the interest rates of hard money lenders. Lower rates and fees mean more money in your pocket by the time your property sells.

Hard Money and Bank Funding

Hard money’s role is to save the day when you need a quick close. Banks are the stars if you need a slow and steady loan at low cost. Having just one or the other won’t cut it. You need both forms of leverage.

Read the full article here.

Watch the video here:

https://youtu.be/3_T81gqiZdk

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What changes to expect on LTVs for fix-and-flip loans when the Fed tightens money.

There are a couple ways raised federal interest rates impact fix-and-flips.

In about six to twelve months, the market is expected to have another shift. Prices should come down, and better properties will become available.

However, your fix-and-flip loans when the Fed tightens money also get tougher to work with. To be ready for those upcoming opportunities, here’s what you need to know about loans for fix-and-flips now.

Fix-and-Flip Loans with Tightened Money

What does it mean for real estate investors when the Fed starts tightening money? Lenders start to pull back.

Lenders want to wait to figure out what will happen with the markets. Their money isn’t returned as fast as usual because investors’ properties take longer to sell. Less money becomes available overall.

This tightening of money results in many recent changes we’ve seen in loans for fix-and-flips.

Changes in LTVs

The loan-to-cost or loan-to-ARV on properties has lowered, and appraisals are being cut. The average LTV used to be 75%. Now, most lenders have pulled back to 65-70%.

Lower LTVs mean you need to bring more money into a deal. It’ll take more out-of-pocket to actually close on a property in the current market.

With low LTVs and lenders being picky with transactions, it’s important to only take fix-and-flips you can obviously turn a profit on.

Home Value Changes

While loan-to-values are going down, credit score requirements are going up. Typically, lenders’ credit score minimums start at 620 or 640. Now, many lenders won’t take anyone with lower than a 680 or 700 score. Six months from now, that could become even tighter.

If you’ve been investing for a while, you’ll need to change how you look at leverage. For the past ten years, lenders have been seeking you. Now, you’ll have to proactively find your money. It’s more important than ever to plan your funding.

Read the full article here.

Watch the video here:

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If you’re an investor, here’s how the current real estate market is impacting bridge loans for you.

Federal interest rates keep rising, tightening up money across the country for real estate investors.

The entire real estate market is feeling the squeeze of rates. Many fix-and-flips on the market now were purchased in a different market. Investors may have expected to get top-dollar for houses that now may take weeks or months to sell at all.

The Market Changes & Bridge Loans

Firstly, what changes have already occurred, and what can we expect going forward for bridge loans?

In general, you can expect the following changes from real estate leverage lenders:

  • Lower LTVs – The amount of money you can get from a lender will continue to go down.
  • Cutting Appraisals Lenders expect a 5% to 15% decrease in market prices, and appraisals will begin to reflect that.
  • Shortened Terms – The length of bridge loans or some lenders will be cut in half.
  • Credit Score – While a 620 credit score used to be the minimum, now lenders won’t consider applicants with less than a 680.
  • Pricing – Six to eight months ago, you could get a bridge loan at a 7% to 8% interest rate. Now, they’re around 10% or 11%.

Just as you might feel some uncertainty in these economic times, lenders feel it too. Lending institutions want to keep themselves safe. Unfortunately for real estate investors, that means tight money in this real estate market is impacting bridge loans.

Why Bridge Loans are Needed

Secondly, these market conditions increase the demand for bridge loans. Homes may be staying on the market longer, but lenders still need their loans paid back on time, and you still need to move on to your next project.

Now is the time to set yourself up well financially. Due to tightened conditions now, the market 6 months from now will have a lot of great deals for investors. Bridge loans can help you get ready.

With a bridge loan, you can free up the capital you have in houses on the market. Plus, you can improve your relationship with lenders by paying off your flip loan.

You can put your flipped house into a short-term bridge loan for 2 to 3 years. In the meantime, you could rent out the property, or just use the loan to pay off the lender while waiting for a buyer.

Using bridge loans in this way keeps you from foreclosure or other negative effects on your credit.

Who Does Bridge Loans Right Now?

Lastly, the following places are still lending:

  • Small to mid-size banks
  • Lenders that work with capital funds or hedge funds
  • Small lenders, like The Cash Flow Company
  • Some hard money lenders

The catch is they’ve all tightened their funds.

You can get a bridge loan from these places. You’ll just get lower LTVs, higher rates, and need a better credit score.

In this market, it’s important to reach out to any lender who can help you. Nothing will fall into your lap – you’ll have to actively search to find a loan product to fit your bridge needs.

You can also work with a place like The Cash Flow Company, who always searches for the best real estate loans available.

Read the full article here.

Watch the video here:

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What are your options when a past project is stuck on the market? Here’s how to use a bridge loan to buy a new property.

Gone will be the days of fix-and-flips selling within hours. 

In this new market, real estate investors need to prepare for the possibility of their projects staying on the market for quite a while.

To avoid a full standstill in your real estate investment career, you have to know how a bridge loan can help you buy a new property.

Buy a New Property with a Bridge Loan in 2022

Instead of selling in two to three days, we’ll soon see houses taking two to three months to sell, depending on size and location.

Your investment career can’t come to a halt just because a house takes too long to sell. What if you find a great deal while your old project is still on the market? All your capital is tied up in that first property.

Bridge loans solve this problem.

A bridge loan puts a lien on both the new property and the old property. This gives you the equity needed to close on a new house before the money from selling the old one hits your pocket.

Using a bridge loan to buy a new property is the number one use of bridge loans.

What to Look For In a Bridge Loan

Bridge loans are all about getting the right lender and the right position.

Terms of a Bridge Loan to Buy a New Property

It’s important to pay attention to the terms of a bridge loan. You want a lender who charges fewer points – even if their interest rate is higher.

You only have to pay interest in small, monthly chunks. With points, you have to pay a percentage of the whole loan. Since bridge loans are very short-term, you won’t end up paying much in interest anyway. However, you’ll still have to pay the points (regardless of how long you kept the loan).

Shop Around for Lenders

Make sure you shop around for the right lender for your bridge loan. Find out who does bridge loans, who can do them quickly, and who focuses more on the interest rate rather than other costs (originations, appraisals, etc.).

Bridge loans are meant to be quick, short-term, and relatively inexpensive. You want to find a lender who can provide that.

Read the full article on bridge loans here.

Watch the video here:

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Text: "How to Maximize Leverage"

Leverage is a powerful investing tool. How does it look to maximize your leverage?

A real estate investor’s goal is to maximize leverage – get the best, cheapest, easiest leverage available.

This means going an extra step:

  • Having great credit.
  • Having great income.
  • Coming to the lender prepared.
  • Having investment experience.

In a previous blog post, we broke down the difference using leverage makes for your income and net worth.

Now, let’s say you’ve done everything right, and you’ve earned yourself better leverage from your lender.

What happens when the same scenario is taken to the next level with top-tier leverage?

80% Leverage

To start, we’ll say you meet the bank’s criteria, and they agree to lend you 80% (or $80,000) on each $100,000 house you purchase.

Income with Maximized Leverage

Your down payment per property is now only $20,000, so you can afford 5 properties. But since you borrowed more money, the mortgage payment is higher, and the net rent goes down to $750/month.

Five properties with an income of $700 per month is $3,500 per month. This works out to be $42,000 per year. Annually, that’s $6,000 more than using a 75% loan, and $27,600 more than using no leverage at all.

Equity with Maximized Leverage

Lastly, let’s look at the wealth side with maxed-out leverage.

Thirty years adds $750,000 to the value of the 5 homes. All that money is added to your net worth.

As a result of the $750k of equity plus the $500k of the original purchase of the homes, your net worth increases by $1,250,000.

Once your mortgage is paid off and you own all 5 properties free and clear, you earn the full amount of rent per month. This is $1,200 × 5 properties, or $6,000 per month!

Using good leverage has the potential to make you literal millions of dollars over buying investment properties in cash.

Read the full article here.

Watch the video here:

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Everything you need to know about bridge loans right now in the current market.

The demand for bridge loans is up in the real estate investment community. Yet the availability of loans is decreasing every day.

Why is this? Who is still lending?  What are the current costs? And how do you find these lenders?

Let’s dive in.

Why the Real Estate Market Has Changed

Federal interest rates keep rising, tightening up money across the country for real estate investors.

The entire real estate market is feeling the squeeze of rates. Many fix-and-flips on the market now were purchased in a different market. Investors may have expected to get top-dollar for houses that now may take weeks or months to sell at all.

The Market Changes & Bridge Loans

What changes have already occurred, and what can we expect going forward for bridge loans?

In general, you can expect the following changes from real estate leverage lenders:

  • Lower LTVs – The amount of money you can get from a lender will continue to go down.
  • Cutting Appraisals Lenders expect a 5% to 15% decrease in market prices, and appraisals will begin to reflect that.
  • Shortened Terms – The length of bridge loans or some lenders will be cut in half.
  • Credit Score – While a 620 credit score used to be the minimum, now lenders won’t consider applicants with less than a 680.
  • Pricing – Six to eight months ago, you could get a bridge loan at a 7% to 8% interest rate. Presently, they’re around 10% or 11%.

Just as you might feel some uncertainty in these economic times, lenders feel it too. Lending institutions want to keep themselves safe. Unfortunately for real estate investors, that means tight money – including bridge loans.

Why Bridge Loans are Needed

These market conditions increase the demand for bridge loans. Homes may be staying on the market longer, but lenders still need their loans paid back on time, and you still need to move on to your next project.

Now is the time to set yourself up well financially. Due to tightened conditions now, the market 6 months from now will have a lot of great deals for investors. Bridge loans can help you get ready.

With a bridge loan, you can free up the capital you have in houses on the market. Plus, you can improve your relationship with lenders by paying off your flip loan.

You can put your flipped house into a short-term bridge loan for 2 to 3 years. In the meantime, you could rent out the property, or just use the loan to pay off the lender while waiting for a buyer.

Using bridge loans in this way keeps you from foreclosure or other negative effects on your credit.

Who Does Bridge Loans Right Now?

The following places are still lending:

  • Small to mid-size banks
  • Lenders that work with capital funds or hedge funds
  • Small lenders, like The Cash Flow Company
  • Some hard money lenders

The catch is they’ve all tightened their funds.

You can get a bridge loan from these places. You’ll just get lower LTVs, higher rates, and need a better credit score.

In this market, it’s important to reach out to any lender who can help you. Nothing will fall into your lap – you’ll have to actively search to find a loan product to fit your bridge needs.

You can also work with a place like The Cash Flow Company, who always searches for the best real estate loans available.

What Is the Cost of Bridge Loans Right Now?

There are 3 main types of bridge loan lenders: banks, capital funds/hedge funds, and local hard money lenders. 

But the market has changed. Here’s a glimpse into what you can expect for the next few months:

Rates

Banks – Interest rates average around 6% to 6.5% for banks.

Capital Funds – Expect 10% to 12% interest rates for hedge fund bridge loans right now.

Hard Money – Hard money interest rates are about the same as cap funds, around 10% to 12%, but with a bit more flexibility.

Points

Banks – Banks have the cheapest money, at 1 to 1.5 points. Smaller banks tend to charge more in origination fees than national banks.

Capital Funds – Cap funds charge around 2 to 3 points.

Hard Money – You can expect 2 to 4 points on a hard money bridge loan transaction.

LTVs

Banks – Depending on your relationship with the bank, you can get up to  65% to 70% LTV on a bridge loan.

Capital Funds – You can get 65% LTV on a refinance or bridge loan with a hedge fund.

Hard Money – Hard money has the most LTV flexibility, like putting a cross-lien on other properties. Typical LTV range is 70% to 75%.

Terms of Bridge Loans

Banks – For bridge loans, banks have the most flexible, longest terms, from 1 to 3 years.

Capital Funds – For cap funds, 3-year bridge loans are now two. Two-year bridge loans are now one.

Hard Money – Bridge loans from hard money have the shortest terms – as short as 1 month, and typically no longer than 1 year.

Closing Times

Banks – Banks’ lead time for a bridge loan is typically 3 to 6 weeks. But lately, we’ve seen loans take up to a couple months in the current market.

Capital Funds – The standard closing time for cap funds is 2 to 3 weeks.

Hard Money – Hard money can close fastest – which is very important for a bridge loan. Depending on your relationship with the lender, the loan can take a week or less.

Location

Banks – Banks have a footprint they’ll lend within, which is typically very local.

Capital Funds – Hedge funds lend nationwide. They’re the best option for multi-state bridge loans.

Hard Money – Hard money lenders are flexible. But, they tend to lend locally, or in other areas they’re familiar with.

Valuation

Banks – Banks require an appraisal for all loans over $250,000. (And some loans under that amount).

Capital Funds – Hedge funds always require an appraisal.

Hard Money – There is no appraisal in the hard money loan process. That’s why they can close so much faster than everyone else.

Overview

Banks – Will be your cheapest but slowest options. They have high requirements.

Capital Funds – Middle of the road for cost and speed, but helpful if you need loans within multiple urban areas.

Hard Money – The most expensive option for bridge loans, but also the most flexible and the fastest.

How Do You Find Bridge Loan Lenders?

For bridge loans right now in these changing times, you need to be proactive.

Where to Search for Bridge Loan Lenders

Check with local real estate communities (REITs in your area, biggerpockets.com, etc). Once you get some lender names, call around. Overall, it may take some effort to find lenders.

Or you can offload the research onto us.

We search every day for the best bridge loans in the real estate world.

Email us with a question about a deal or a bridge loan need, and we’ll find a way to help: Info@TheCashFlowCompany.com.

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Text: "How to 5X Your Real Estate Investments"

Leverage can 5x your real estate investments. Let’s look at how.

Should a real estate investor ever avoid leverage? Should they always use cash when possible?

Short answer: nope.

Using leverage can help you 5x your real estate investments. Let’s take a simple example to show how it works.

Cash vs Leverage

First off, we’re going to use simple numbers in this example.

Of course, home costs and rent costs will change in different markets and different areas. But we’ll run with these numbers – even if they aren’t 100% accurate, they’ll paint a good picture of the math that backs up leverage.

Let’s say you have $100,000 at your disposal that you want to invest in real estate.

Income Real Estate Investing with NO Leverage

To begin with, you could take all the money and buy one property valued at $100,000 outright. You’d invest the full $100k, own the house free and clear, and receive $1,200 of net rent income per month.

This adds up to $14,400 per year you’d earn from a house you fully own.

Income Real Estate Investing WITH Leverage

Now let’s see how it plays out when you involve a lender rather than buying outright.

You could offer to put down $25,000, and the lender might agree to loan you the other $75,000. That $75,000 covered by the lender would be your leverage.

And now, instead of pouring all your money into one property… you only have to put in $25,000.

Take your $100,000 and divide it by 25,000. That’s 4 properties you could buy with leverage. For the same out-of-pocket amount as buying 1 property outright.

However, because you’re now paying a mortgage on these rental properties, your monthly net rent goes down.

Your income is now $750 per property. Multiplied by 4 properties. So this brings in $3,000 per month, or $36,000 per year.

You have the potential to make an additional $21,600 per year – just from using leverage.

No matter what amount you start with (in this case, $100,000), using leverage brings in more income.

How Does Leverage Change Your Net Worth?

Monthly rent income isn’t the only way a rental property makes you money. It will also increase in value.

When a home appreciates, it increases your total net worth. The average yearly appreciation rate for real estate across the country is 5%.

It’s clear that leverage impacts income, but what about wealth?

Let’s throw this 5% number into our equation and see what happens with leverage.

Net Worth No Leverage

If a property was purchased for $100,000, that one home would increase in value by an average of $5,000 per year.

So, the one home you bought outright would give you $150,000 in equity after 30 years.

You bought it for $100,000. After 30 years, you’re adding $150,000. So that’s a net value of $250,000.

Net Worth with Leverage

Next, let’s see the equity of the 4 properties purchased with leverage.

Multiply your 4 properties by the $5,000 in value they each increase every year. Your portfolio will appreciate $20,000 per year.

Over a 30-year span, your 4 properties would add $600,000 to your net worth. Add the original values of the homes (4 × $100,000), and your net worth increases by $1,000,000.

A million using leverage definitely beats the $250k you got from buying 1 home outright.

Read the full article here.

Watch the video here:

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Text: "Bridge Loans"

The real estate market is changing. Here’s what you need to know about bridge loans in 2022.

Have you used bridge loans for your portfolio in the past? 

In 2022, all money sources are tightening for real estate investors. Interest rates are rising, banks are reluctant to lend, and lender requirements have shot up.

You might find you’ll need more bridge loans than ever before.

Here are 3 ways you can use bridge loans for real estate investing in 2022.

1. Gap Loans to Supplement Hard Money

In the current market, lenders’ priority is to lower their risk. Many hard money lenders are limiting loans to 65% of the after-repair value (ARV).

If you could still complete a project under-budget at 65%, you’ll be able to find a lot of funding options. But if your project will take more than 65% of the ARV to complete, you might need to bring in a bridge loan.

A bridge loan can fill the gaps left by a hard money loan – whether for a down payment, rehab expenses, or carry costs.

You can get a bridge loan from:

  • A hard money lender
  • A hedge fund
  • Real OPM

OPM (Other People’s Money) is the ideal option for this type of gap funding. OPM is real money from people you know. It can be used to bridge gaps in investments, refinance hard money, and more.

2. Buy a New Property with Bridge Loans in 2022

Another effect of the upcoming market is the amount of time houses will take to sell.

Instead of selling in two to three days, we’ll soon see houses taking two to three months to sell, depending on size and location.

Your investment career can’t come to a halt just because a house takes too long to sell. What if you find a great deal while your old project is still on the market? All your capital is tied up in that first property.

Bridge loans solve this problem.

A bridge loan puts a lien on both the new property and the old property. This gives you the equity needed to close on a new house before the money from selling the old one hits your pocket.

Bridging from one property to the next like this is the number one way investors use bridge loans.

3. Bridge Loans for Wholesalers

Wholesalers use bridge loans, too. Sometimes called “transactional” or “wholetailing” loans, these short-term funds are also a type of bridge loans.

This type of loan bridges a very small gap. Usually, it’s just the money needed for one day until the buyer’s money comes into the title company.

With these types of bridge loans, it’s important for wholesalers to find a lender who will give 100% financing, without overcharging.

What to Look For In Bridge Loans in 2022

Bridge loans are all about getting the right lender and the right position.

Terms of a Bridge Loan

It’s important to pay attention to the terms of a bridge loan. You want a lender who charges fewer points – even if their interest rate is higher.

You only have to pay interest in small, monthly chunks. With points, you have to pay a percentage of the whole loan. Since bridge loans are very short-term, you won’t end up paying much in interest anyway. However, you’ll still have to pay the points (regardless of how long you kept the loan).

Shop Around for Lenders

Make sure you shop around for the right lender for your bridge loan. Find out who does bridge loans, who can do them quickly, and who focuses more on the interest rate rather than other costs (originations, appraisals, etc.).

Bridge loans are meant to be quick, short-term, and relatively inexpensive. You want to find a lender who can provide that.

How The Cash Flow Company Can Help

The Cash Flow Company offers DSCR loans, traditional loans, and blanket loans. Plus, we have the flexibility of hard money.

If you have any questions about bridge loans in general or our bridge loans in particular, reach out!

Email us with a specific deal or question at Info@TheCashFlowCompany.com.

Join our weekly call where we work with investors’ deals in real time, every Thursday from 1:15 PM – 2:15 PM MST.

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How to turn $100,000 into $1.25 million by real estate investing with leverage.

A real estate investor’s most valuable tool is leverage.

Without it, you can’t buy, can’t hold, and can’t profit from your properties.

To prove our point that leverage is the most important step in real estate investing, let’s ask the question:

If you had the free capital to spend, would you make more money by buying a home outright or by using debt (leverage)?

Let’s break down a simple transaction to answer this question.

How Far Can You Get with $100,000?

First off, we’re going to use simple numbers in this example.

Of course, home costs and rent costs will change in different markets and different areas. But we’ll run with these numbers – even if they aren’t 100% accurate, they’ll paint a good picture of the math that backs up leverage.

Let’s say you have $100,000 at your disposal that you want to invest in real estate.

Income Real Estate Investing with NO Leverage

To begin with, you could take all the money and buy one property valued at $100,000 outright. You’d invest the full $100k, own the house free and clear, and receive $1,200 of net rent income per month.

This adds up to $14,400 per year you’d earn from a house you fully own.

Income Real Estate Investing WITH Leverage

Now let’s see how it plays out when you involve a lender rather than buying outright.

You could offer to put down $25,000, and the lender might agree to loan you the other $75,000. That $75,000 covered by the lender would be your leverage.

And now, instead of pouring all your money into one property… you only have to put in $25,000.

Take your $100,000 and divide it by 25,000. That’s 4 properties you could buy with leverage. For the same out-of-pocket amount as buying 1 property outright.

However, because you’re now paying a mortgage on these rental properties, your monthly net rent goes down.

Your income is now $750 per property. Multiplied by 4 properties. So this brings in $3,000 per month, or $36,000 per year.

You have the potential to make an additional $21,600 per year – just from using leverage.

No matter what amount you start with (in this case, $100,000), using leverage brings in more income.

How Does Leverage Change Your Net Worth?

Monthly rent income isn’t the only way a rental property makes you money. It will also increase in value.

When a home appreciates, it increases your total net worth. The average yearly appreciation rate for real estate across the country is 5%.

It’s clear that leverage impacts income, but what about wealth?

Let’s throw this 5% number into our equation and see what happens with leverage.

Net Worth No Leverage

If a property was purchased for $100,000, that one home would increase in value by an average of $5,000 per year.

So, the one home you bought outright would give you $150,000 in equity after 30 years.

You bought it for $100,000. After 30 years, you’re adding $150,000. So that’s a net value of $250,000.

Net Worth with Leverage

Next, let’s see the equity of the 4 properties purchased with leverage.

Multiply your 4 properties by the $5,000 in value they each increase every year. Your portfolio will appreciate $20,000 per year.

Over a 30-year span, your 4 properties would add $600,000 to your net worth. Add the original values of the homes (4 × $100,000), and your net worth increases by $1,000,000.

A million using leverage definitely beats the $250k you got from buying 1 home outright.

What If You Maximize Your Real Estate Investing Leverage?

A real estate investor’s goal is to maximize leverage – get the best, cheapest, easiest leverage available.

This means going an extra step:

  • Having great credit.
  • Having great income.
  • Coming to the lender prepared.
  • Having investment experience.

Let’s say you’ve done everything right, and you’ve earned yourself better leverage from your lender.

What happens when the same scenario is taken to the next level with top-tier leverage?

80% Leverage

You meet the bank’s criteria, and they agree to lend you 80% (or $80,000) on each $100,000 house you purchase.

Income with Maximized Leverage

Your down payment per property is now only $20,000, so you can afford 5 properties. But since you borrowed more money, the mortgage payment is higher, and the net rent goes down to $750/month.

Five properties with an income of $700 per month is $3,500 per month. This works out to be $42,000 per year. Annually, that’s $6,000 more than using a 75% loan, and $27,600 more than using no leverage at all.

Equity with Maximized Leverage

Lastly, let’s look at the wealth side with maxed-out leverage.

Thirty years adds $750,000 to the value of the 5 homes. All that money is added to your net worth.

As a result of the $750k of equity plus the $500k of the original purchase of the homes, your net worth is increased $1,250,000.

Once your mortgage is paid off and you own all 5 properties free and clear, you earn the full amount of rent per month. This is $1,200 × 5 properties, or $6,000 per month!

Using good leverage has the potential to make you literal millions of dollars over buying investment properties in cash.

How to Start Maximizing Your Leverage as a Real Estate Investor

Our goal is to help you understand and use the power of leverage. We scour the markets looking for debt with the best terms – the lowest down payments, the lowest credit requirements, and the lowest rates.

If you’re looking to maximize your leverage, email us at Info@TheCashFlowCompany.com. We’ll help you with questions and deals, and get you headed in the right direction.

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