Tag Archive for: rental property loans

Here’s how to calculate a property’s DSCR (and what it means for your loan).

Don’t be intimidated by a DSCR loan. If the property cash flows, then you have a pretty good shot at getting approved.

And there’s a simple way to find out the cash flow of a rental property: the debt service coverage ratio.

This ratio is used by underwriters to determine if a property is positively cash flowing. It’s an important metric to understand if you want to maximize your leverage and get the most out of your investments.

Let’s go over how to calculate DSCR quickly and understand what it means for your property.

What Is a DSCR in Real Estate?

First, let’s define what DSCR is. It’s a ratio that compares a property’s income to its expenses.

You calculate DSCR by dividing the property’s income (rents) by its expenses (monthly mortgage payment, taxes, insurance, and HOA if applicable). A ratio of greater than 1 means the property is cash flowing, which is what both you and your lender want to see.

The higher the ratio, the better the cash flow, and the more money in your pocket.

For a DSCR loan, the higher this ratio is, the better the terms your loan will have.

How to Calculate Expenses & Income for a DSCR Loan

To find out the expenses your DSCR loan will consider, you’ll add together four items:

  • Mortgage
  • Property Tax
  • Insurance
  • HOA Fees

To find out the income, you’ll need to check out what rents are in the area for comparable properties.

How to Calculate the DSCR

To give you a better understanding of how to calculate DSCR, let’s look at a quick example.

Let’s say we have a property with rents coming in at $1,700 a month. 

The monthly mortgage payment is $1,290. Taxes are $100/ month, insurance is $100/month, and HOA is $100 /month. Added together, this gives us $1,590.

Now, to calculate the DSCR ratio, we divide the income ($1,700) by the expenses ($1,590). We get a ratio of 1.07.

This is great! The break-even point for a DSCR is a ratio of 1. Underwriters and lenders like to see a ratio of at least 1 to ensure that the property can take care of itself. Now lenders know you won’t need to take money out of your pocket to cover the expenses. This is assurance for them, making them more likely to approve the loan with good terms.

A 1.07 ratio means the property is positively cash flowing, and it’s a good investment.

Example of a Low Ratio

But what if we could only charge $1,500 in rent for this same property? 

Let’s look at the impact of a decrease in rent. In this case, we’d calculate the DSCR ratio by dividing $1,500 (income) by $1,590 (expenses), which gives us 0.94. You’ll need an extra $90 out-of-pocket just to breakeven.

This is less than 1, meaning the property is negatively cash flowing.

You need to estimate the rent on a property before you think about buying it. This property at $1,500 wouldn’t be a good investment (and wouldn’t qualify for a good DSCR loan). But remember – the same property at $1,700 rent would be a good investment.

Usually, the only time DSCR loans are used on a negatively cash-flowing property is when someone gets stuck with a property they can’t sell, and a little income on the property is better than none at all. It’s not wise to purchase a rental property that you know won’t cash flow from day 1.

Negative DSCR Loans

You can still find a DSCR product for negative cash flow properties.

There are certain thresholds when you calculate DSCR loans. When you break these thresholds, you get a better rate. And better rates mean… more cash flow! Your monthly payments will lower.

Let’s go over what some of these thresholds will look like.

Loans for a 1.25 DSCR

Say we have a property with $1,590 worth of monthly expenses, which we can charge a $2,000 rent on. Divide the rent by the expenses, and we get a DSCR of about 1.26.

One way of thinking of this is that the property is profiting 25% over the expenses. That’s good for the underwriter (and it’s good for you).

1.25 is a threshold for DSCR lenders. In the current market at the beginning of 2022, the rate for a 1.25 DSCR is around 7.25%.

Rates for a Negative to 1 DSCR

If a property has negative cash flow, say 0.944, then the average interest rate would be 9+% on a DSCR loan.

For a breakeven ratio of 1, the typical interest rate right now would be more like 7.75%.

The Difference

Anytime you can lower the rate, that’s cash flow that goes into your pocket.

The difference between a negative DSCR and a 1.25 is about $220/month on your payment. Over the course of a year, that adds up to $2,600. If you have 5 rental properties, that’s $13,000/year. At 10 rental properties, it’s a $26,000 difference!

If real estate investing is going to be your career or retirement plan, buying properties that you know will cash flow is vital. A couple hundred bucks a month can snowball into hundreds of thousands over time.

This is why it’s important to know how to calculate DSCR quickly when you’re looking at buying a new property. Never put a contract on a rental property when you’re not sure if the cash flow fits your goals.

How to Calculate DSCR Quickly

To help keep the numbers straight when you calculate DSCR, you can download our free, simple DSCR calculator at this link.

If you have any other questions about how to calculate DSCR (or how to get a DSCR loan!), send us an email at Info@TheCashFlowCompany.com.

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A few reasons why DSCR loans are some of the best loans for real estate investors.

Not all loans are created equal when it comes to real estate investing.

A traditional loan doesn’t always cut it for a value-add property. But there’s no possible way hard money can work for a rental property for more than a few months.

So what are your long-term investor loan options?

This is where the DSCR loan comes in. Here are 3 quick reasons why DSCR loans work well for investors.

Less Paperwork

The investor’s dream: less paperwork. Applications and approvals are simple with DSCR loans. There are no income requirements, employment verification, or any other intensive qualifications.

Not only is it less hassle to skip some paperwork – it also means the entire loan process is much faster.

Short-Term Rentals

DSCR loans don’t just work for traditional rentals, but they work for all real estate investment properties. DSCR loans are flexible and work with a variety of rental options. This includes VRBO, Airbnb, or a traditional long-term property.

There are a few things to take into consideration with short-term rentals and DSCR. But it’s still a simple and often profitable loan for these types of properties.

Best Loans for Real Estate Investors Doing BRRRR

Many investors wonder – are DSCR loans good for BRRRR-style properties? The answer is yes.

DSCR loans are great for the long-term, refinance loan at the end of your BRRRR project. The combination of a quick and easy loan and a structure designed for rental properties makes DSCR and BRRRR the perfect pair.

DSCR – The Best Loans for Real Estate Investors

If you’re in the market for a long-term loan on a rental property, reach out to us for help with the numbers. Send us a deal or ask us a question at Info@TheCashFlowCompany.com.

Read the full article here.

Watch the video here:

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It’s “the easy loan.” But are DSCR loans good for your investments?

DSCR loans are becoming one of the most popular investor tools out there. 

But why are they so well-loved? Let’s go over 5 reasons investors like DSCR loans. 

Are DSCR Loans Good?

Firstly, let’s go over what a DSCR loan is.

DSCR stands for “debt service coverage ratio.” They’re a loan for rental properties that are based on the debt ratio of rent income to the property’s expenses.

These loans can be flexible and hassle-free. This makes them the go-to choice for investors financing a rental property or turning a fix-and-flip project into a rental at the last minute in bad markets.

But are DSCR loans really as good as they seem? Let’s take a closer look at 5 reasons why DSCR loans are a solid choice for investors. 

#1: You can start investing now.

DSCR loans are great for new investors. Traditional loans often require you have two years of real estate investing experience.

Because there are no experience requirements, a DSCR loan is a great opportunity to get into your first investment rental property. Don’t wait to apply for your first DSCR loan.

#2: No income requirements.

With a DSCR loan, you don’t have to have a W2 job, or show any tax returns or other income documentation.

This means DSCR loans are good for minimizing your tax liability. You can write everything off, pay the IRS as little as you want, and still get a great loan.

#3: Less paperwork.

The investor’s dream: less paperwork. Applications and approvals are simple with DSCR loans. There are no income requirements, employment verification, or any other intensive qualifications.

Not only is it less hassle to skip some paperwork – it also means the entire loan process is much faster.

#4: DSCR works for short-term rentals too.

DSCR loans don’t just work for traditional rentals, but they work for all real estate investment properties. DSCR loans are flexible and work with a variety of rental options. This includes VRBO, Airbnb, or renting out a traditional long-term property.

There are a few things to take into consideration with short-term rentals and DSCR. But it’s still a simple and often profitable loan for these types of properties.

#5: Great for BRRRRs.

Many investors wonder – are DSCR loans good for BRRRR-style properties? The answer is yes.

DSCR loans are great for the long-term, refinance loan at the end of your BRRRR project. The combination of a quick and easy loan and a structure designed for rental properties makes DSCR and BRRRR the perfect pair.

Want to find out how a DSCR loan might work with your BRRRR rental? You can download our free DSCR loan calculator here. It can help you learn your ratio and get an idea of the kind of terms your property may qualify for.

Are DSCR Loans Good for Your Property?

If you’re in the market for a loan on a rental property, you can reach out to us to help with the numbers. Send us a deal or ask us a question at Info@TheCashFlowCompany.com.

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Investors think of DSCR loans as the “easy loan.” But here are 3 DSCR loan money requirements you need to know.

Sure, DSCR loans have a simpler underwriting process and criteria compared to conventional mortgages.

But there are a few key expenses you’ll need to keep in mind.

When applying for a DSCR loan, it’s important to have a solid plan in place for covering the necessary down payment, closing costs, and reserves. Here’s what you need to know about DSCR loan money requirements.

Down Payment

The down payment is the upfront payment you make when purchasing a property. This is whatever isn’t covered by your DSCR loan’s LTV.

Closing Costs

Closing costs are the fees associated with obtaining a loan, including lender fees, appraisal fees, and title insurance. These costs can vary widely, but generally range from 2-5% of the loan amount. It’s important to budget for these costs and have the funds available at closing.

Reserves: An Important DSCR Loan Money Requirement

Most importantly, DSCR loans will require reserves.

Many lenders require you to have 3-6 months’ worth of mortgage payments in reserve to protect against unexpected situations, such as a tenant vacating the property.

These funds can come from your own savings or from borrowing OPM (Other People’s Money) from a business partner, friend, or family member.

By having a solid plan in place for covering these money requirements, you can increase your chances of getting approved for a DSCR loan. Keep in mind that your lender will want to see evidence of these funds in order to approve your loan.

More on DSCR Loan Money Requirements and Other Criteria

Read the full article here.

Watch the video here:

 

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This loan type is an investor’s secret weapon… Here’s how to get a DSCR loan in 5 steps.

You need money to make money. But it doesn’t have to be your money.

Real estate investing is a highly leveraged game. 

DSCR loans are different from conventional loans like Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac because they have more lenient guidelines. DSCR loans can have anywhere from 30 to 100 different funding sources, and each one has their own underwriting rules. 

Every lender will have different prices, terms, and underwriting criteria. But here are 5 things you’ll definitely need to know to get a DSCR loan approval.

1. Credit Score: Understanding Your Credit

Your credit score is the main factor that lenders consider when evaluating your loan application. 

A higher credit score can get you a better loan-to-value (LTV) ratio and a lower interest rate. For example, a 740 score will get you an LTV 5-10% more than a 640 score. Your interest rate with a 740 score will be .5-2% lower than the interest rate with a 640 score.

If your credit score is below 700, you should take steps to improve it – such as paying down credit card debt and making sure all your payments are on time. 

This article offers some ideas for raising your credit score quickly. You can also download this free credit score checklist to get you where you need to be.

2. Money: Down Payments, Closing Costs, and Reserves

In addition to the down payment, you’ll need to have enough money for closing costs and reserves.

For reserves on a DSCR loan, lenders often require you to have 3-6 months’ worth of mortgage payments. This extra cash protects the lender in case your tenant unexpectedly vacates or some other unexpected situation arises.

The money doesn’t necessarily have to be yours – you can borrow OPM from a business partner, friend, or family member. To get a DSCR loan, though, your lender will want to see the funds for a down payment and reserves to approve you.

3. Know Your Numbers: Property Income and Expenses

DSCR loans are based on the property’s ability to generate income and pay for itself. So your in-flow and out-flow numbers are a major factor in whether or not you get a DSCR loan.

The minimum requirement is that the rents cover all expenses, including:

  • The mortgage payment
  • Taxes
  • Insurance
  • Any HOA fees

Expenses not considered by your lender include:

  • Property management fees
  • Utilities
  • Maintenance

If the property generates more income than expenses, you’ll get a better rate. However, if it doesn’t break even, you’ll likely end up paying a higher rate.

For example, if you show a lender your property can bring in $1,250 and your payments are only $1,000, you can get a better rate.

Know your numbers to get your DSCR loan approved.

4. Be Prepared: Gather Your Info to Get a DSCR Loan

If you want to not only get approved for a DSCR loan, but have it happen quickly, make sure you have all your documents and information ready to go.

Treat your real estate investing like a business – and like you’re a professional. If you come to a lender prepared, you get:

  • First dibs
  • Fast service
  • Better rates

Lenders want to do business with people who prove they can stay on top of their finances and paperwork. Just as you want to rent to “easy” tenants, lenders want to help investors who cause the least amount of friction.

It also benefits you to be competent and prepared so you can read the lender better. Unfortunately, not all financial institutions have your best interest in mind, so being prepared helps ensure you find the best deal.

5. Shop Around: Compare Offers from Multiple Lenders

There are many different funding sources for DSCR loans, and they all have different terms and rates. To get the best deal, it’s important to shop around and compare offers from multiple lenders.

It may benefit you to stay away from jack-of-all-trades lenders. Look for lenders who specialize in DSCR loans and have a track record of working with real estate investors. They will have the most options for you to get the DSCR loan product that best fits your specific property.

Have the money, understand where your credit is, and know the numbers for the property. Taking 20 minutes per week to stay on top of this means all the difference for your approval on a DSCR loan (and for your real estate investment career!).

How to Get the BEST DSCR Loan

These 5 steps will get you well on your way to approval for a DSCR investor loan.

Remember to focus on:

  • Improving your credit score
  • Having money for down payments and reserves
  • Knowing your numbers
  • Being prepared
  • Shopping around for the best deal. 

Leverage is king in real estate. With a little bit of effort, you can secure the financing you need to grow your real estate investment portfolio.

Send us an email at Info@TheCashFlowCompany.com. Show us a deal you’re looking at or ask any questions you still need answered.

Let’s make you the most successful investor we can.

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The basics on calculating the paydown payment on the amortization part of an interest-only loan.

There are two parts to an interest-only loan. Part one is just interest, and part two is the paydown, or amortization.

You never have to wait to get to the paydown in order to refinance your interest-only loan. Some investors refinance the same interest-only property over and over before ever getting to the paydown part.

But it’s important to know the numbers even if you don’t want to keep an interest-only loan until the paydown. Here are the basics of calculating 30-year and 40-year interest only loans.

 

Calculating The Paydown

The interest-only portion of an interest-only loan lasts for a set number of years. For example, let’s say ours lasts 10 years.

The paydown period is when the loan starts amortizing – the actual amount borrowed starts going down. However, you’ll still need to pay normal interest along with the principal payment.

With most lenders, you’ll get either a 30-year or 40-year loan. A 30-year interest-only loan would involve 10 years of just interest, plus 20 years of paydown. For a 40-year, you’d have 30 years’ worth of amortization payments.

A 30-year loan’s payments will be higher because you’re paying the same amount off in a shorter period of time.

Calculating a Paydown Payment Example

Let’s break down the difference between a 30-year and 40-year interest-only loan.

30-year loan = 10 years interest, then 20 years of amortization

40-year loan = 10 years interest, then 30 years amortization

You can use an amortization calculator tool to figure your monthly payments for the paydown period.

Let’s look at an example for a $300,000 interest-only loan. The paydown period payments would be:

30-year =  10 years of $2,000/month + 20 years of $2,509/month

40-year =  10 years of $2,000/month + 30 years of $2,201/month

Remember that you’re never locked into paying a full interest-only loan. An interest-only loan may be worth looking into for your property. Especially if you need a product with lower monthly payments while you wait out rising interest rates.

Help with Interest-Only Loans

Have questions about interest-only loans, or calculating your paydown payment? Is there a deal you’d like us to take a look at?

We search hundreds of loans every month – now is a great time of variety in loan products. We’d love to help you find exactly what you need.

Email us at Info@TheCashFlowCompany.com.

Read the full article here.

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Will an IO loan really save you money? Find out by calculating the interest-only payment.

There are two parts to an interest-only loan. Part one is just interest, and part two is the paydown, or amortization.

Typically, the interest-only period is 5 or 10 years where your only cost is interest. You aren’t required to pay down the principal at all during that time. So for, say, 10 years, you pay interest, but your loan amount stays the same.

Keep in mind, with an interest-only loan, you always have the option to pay down the principal. These loans typically don’t come with a prepayment fee.

Calculating Interest-Only Payment Example

Find the numbers relevant to your deals, and you can follow along by calculating the interest-only payment. You might need a loan for $500,000, or maybe just $100,000. For our example, we’ll use $300,000 as our loan amount.

The interest-only phase of interest-only DSCR loans uses one simple formula.

First, multiply the loan amount by the interest rate. This gives you the yearly interest. Divide that number by 12 (for the 12 months in a year) to get your monthly payment. The formula looks like this:

Loan Amount x Interest Rate = Yearly Interest

Yearly Interest ÷ 12 = Monthly Interest

We’ll use 8% as our example interest rate. So our equation would be:

$300,000 × .08 = $24,000

$24,000 ÷ 12 = $2,000

As long as you don’t pay down any principal during the interest-only period, your payments will be $2,000/month. This $2,000 goes directly to the bank. Your loan amount will remain $300,000, unless you choose to make an extra payment toward the principal.

Calculating the Interest-Only Payment While Paying Principal

Every time you opt into a principal payment during the interest-only period, your monthly payment changes.

For example, let’s say you pay down $20,000 from your loan, leaving the total loan amount as $280,000. You can re-use the previous formula with this new loan amount to get your new monthly payment:

$280,000 × .08 = $22,400

$22,400 ÷ 12 = $1,866

If you chose to pay down your principal by $20,000, your new monthly payment of interest would be $1,866.

How Annual Interest Works on Interest-Only Loans

Don’t let the idea of “annual” interest trip you up. For these interest-only DSCR loans, interest isn’t calculated once from January to December. Instead, the bank will do this formula each month for your loan using your current principal.

Remember that this interest is your monthly loan payment, but it is not your property’s total monthly expenses. If your loan is a DSCR, you also have to consider taxes, insurance, and HOA fees to know your actual monthly expenses.

Pros of Interest-Only Loans

There are two major advantages of interest-only loans:

  • Cash Flow – Interest-only loans lower your payments, which makes for less money out and more money in. With the interest-only period, you can do deals that would never work with a typical loan payment.
  • Flexible Refinance – You can refinance most interest-only loans at any time (dependent on the lender’s prepay policy). It can be a great strategy to use an interest-only loan for the next four or five years while rates are high. When rates come back down, you can refinance into another loan product that will build equity.

Read the full article here.

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