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Quick ‘n Easy DSCR Calculation

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Your DSCR calculation made easy with our free loan calculator.

Don’t be intimidated by a DSCR loan. If the property cash flows, then you have a pretty good shot at getting approved.

And there’s a simple way to find out the cash flow of a rental property: the debt service coverage ratio.

Underwriters use this ratio to determine if a property is positively cash flowing. It’s an important metric to understand if you want to maximize your leverage and get the most out of your investments.

Now, let’s go over how to calculate DSCR quickly and understand what it means for your property.

What Is a DSCR in Real Estate?

Firstly, let’s define what DSCR is. It’s a ratio that compares a property’s income to its expenses.

You calculate DSCR by dividing the property’s income (rents) by its expenses (monthly mortgage payment, taxes, insurance, and HOA if applicable). A ratio of greater than 1 means the property is cash flowing, which is what both you and your lender want to see.

So, the higher the ratio, the better the cash flow, and the more money in your pocket.

For a DSCR loan, the higher this ratio is, the better the terms your loan will have.

Expenses & Income for DSCR Calculation

Next, to find out the expenses your DSCR loan will consider, you’ll add together four items:

  • Mortgage
  • Property Tax
  • Insurance
  • HOA Fees

Finally, to find out the income, you’ll need to check out what rents are in the area for comparable properties.

How to Calculate DSCR Quickly

To help keep all these numbers straight when you calculate DSCR, you can download our free, simple DSCR calculator at this link.

Read the full article here.

Watch the video here:

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There are many DSCR loan options – but how do you calculate the ratio for each one?

Some of your DSCR loan options include 30-year fixed mortgages, 40-year fixed, or interest-only. But how do you know which one’s best?

You’ll have to crunch the numbers. Here’s one example of calculating different DSCR loan options on a $200,000 loan with $2,000 rent.

What Is a DSCR?

DSCR means debt service coverage ratio. It’s a loan for rental properties that hinges on cash flow.

A DSCR loan will be a useful product in your real estate investing career. It requires no income verification and no work or investment history. These loans only require that the property’s income is the same (or higher than) the expenses.

Cash flow is always important to you as an investor, and for DSCR loans, it matters just as much to your lender. The better your cash flow, the better LTV and rates you can get. 

It all depends on a little number – the ratio itself. Here’s how to calculate the DSCR with different loan options.

How to Calculate the DSCR

Loan LTVs and rates on a DSCR are determined by the debt service coverage ratio itself. Now that we have all our raw information, we can plug it into our DSCR calculation to get the ratio.

Here’s how you get the numbers you need:

Add up your expenses (taxes, insurance, and HOA fees) with each loan’s payment amount. Then divide rent by all those expenses.

Costs + Mortgage = Total Expenses

Rent ÷ Total Expenses = DSCR Ratio

Here’s an example of what it would look like with an example using a $200,000 loan and an 8% interest rate:

We want the DSCR to at least equal 1.

Over 1 is ideal. This is a higher cash flow, and you’ll get a better loan.

Less than 1 means negative cash flow, and means you might have to look at a negative DSCR or a no-ratio loan instead.

<1 = Negative Cash Flow

At 1 = Rent = Expenses

>1 = Positive cash flow

Read the full article here.

Watch the video here.

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An important part of a DSCR loan is knowing your costs. Here’s an example DSCR loan calculation to help you out.

A DSCR loan will be a useful product in your real estate investing career. It requires no income verification and no work or investment history. These loans only require that the property’s income is the same (or higher than) the expenses.

Cash flow really is kind for DSCR loans. Here’s a breakdown of how to calculate the expenses to see if you qualify.

Calculate a DSCR Loan Expenses

You can follow along with your DSCR loan calculator (free download here). We’ll fill out this form to show each step of a DSCR loan calculation.

Rent Income & Loan Amount

Firstly, you need to estimate your loan amount and your rent income. If you have a deal in front of you, you probably have a good idea of the loan amount you’ll need to be able to afford the property.

As for rent, you can get realistic amounts from online sources. Look at Zillow or Rent.com to find the market rate for rent in the property’s neighborhood.

Let’s keep it simple for our example and say our loan is $200,000, and our rent income is $2,000.

What Expenses Count in a DSCR Loan?

We know our income (rent), but now we need to figure out our costs.

The expenses considered in a DSCR loan DO include:

Taxes

Insurance

HOA fees

Expenses NOT considered in a DSCR loan are things like:

Property management fees

Utilities

Maintenance

To estimate the taxes on the property, you could use a property tax calculator like this one. If you need an estimate on insurance, you can try this home insurance calculator. You can figure out HOA fees by contacting the HOA, if that applies to your property.

If any of these costs are charged annually, then you’ll need to divide by 12 to break it down into a monthly cost.

Let’s take a look at what information we have now for our example DSCR loan:

Calculating Loan Cost

Secondly, DSCR lenders will offer many types of the loans – fixed-rate mortgages, interest-only, ARMs, etc. You need to find what best fits you, and to do that, you’ll have to run all the numbers.

To calculate each of the amortized loans, you can use an amortization calculator like this one. Add in your information – loan amount, interest rate, and loan length.

We’re going to use an 8% interest rate for our example, since that’s the anticipated average for next year.

In reality, each loan and lender will have a different interest rate. Additionally, the interest rate may fluctuate depending on your qualifications and DSCR. You can get this information from your lenders to plug into your calculator.

We’ll use three common loans for this example: a 30-year fixed, 40-year fixed, and interest only loan.

If we had a 30-year mortgage for $200,000 at 8%, our monthly payment would be $1,467.

For a 40-year fixed with the same info, payments would be $1,390.

For interest-only, you can calculate the loan fairly simply yourself. Multiply the loan amount by the interest rate (e.g., 200,000 × .08 = 16,000). That gives you the yearly interest, then you divide it by 12 to get the monthly payment. For our example, that’s $1,333.

So what do you do with these numbers? How do you know which loan is best?

It depends on your priorities. To have the most cash flow, the lowest number is best (in this case, interest-only). If you need something that amortizes, a 30-year would probably be best.

But you don’t really know which loan will be best for you until you calculate the DSCR.

Read the full article here.

Watch the video here.

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From figuring out expenses to doing the math… Here’s how to calculate a DSCR loan.

The more you know about DSCRs, the more power you have when you go to buy or refinance. 

When you practice the numbers yourself, the less you have to rely on a lender to tell you if a deal is good or not.

Download your own DSCR calculator here. Follow along with your own numbers as we go through an example of how to calculate a DSCR loan.

What Is a DSCR?

DSCR means debt service coverage ratio. It’s a loan for rental properties that hinges on cash flow.

A DSCR loan will be a useful product in your real estate investing career. It requires no income verification and no work or investment history. These loans only require that the property’s income is the same (or higher than) the expenses.

Cash flow is always important to you as an investor, and for DSCR loans, it matters just as much to your lender. The better your cash flow, the better LTV and rates you can get. 

But even if your property has negative cash flow, you still can get DSCR loans. You’ll just have to pay for it when it comes to the LTV and interest rate.

Calculate a DSCR Loan Expenses

You can follow along with your DSCR loan calculator (free download here). We’ll fill out these form to show each step of how to calculate a DSCR loan.

Rent Income & Loan Amount

Firstly, you need to estimate your loan amount and your rent income. If you have a deal in front of you, you probably have a good idea of the loan amount you’ll need to be able to afford the property.

As for rent, you can get realistic amounts from online sources. Look at Zillow or Rent.com to find the market rate for rent in the property’s neighborhood.

Let’s keep it simple for our example and say our loan is $200,000, and our rent income is $2,000.

What Expenses Count in a DSCR Loan?

We know our income (rent), but now we need to figure out our costs.

The expenses considered in a DSCR loan DO include:

Taxes

Insurance

HOA fees

Expenses NOT considered in a DSCR loan are things like:

Property management fees

Utilities

Maintenance

To estimate the taxes on the property, you could use a property tax calculator like this one. If you need an estimate on insurance, you can try this home insurance calculator. You can figure out HOA fees by contacting the HOA, if that applies to your property.

If any of these costs are charged annually, then you’ll need to divide by 12 to break it down into a monthly cost.

Let’s take a look at what information we have now for our example DSCR loan:

Calculating Loan Cost

Secondly, DSCR lenders will offer many types of the loans – fixed-rate mortgages, interest-only, ARMs, etc. You need to find what best fits you, and to do that, you’ll have to run all the numbers.

To calculate each of the amortized loans, you can use an amortization calculator like this one. Add in your information – loan amount, interest rate, and loan length.


We’re going to use an 8% interest rate for our example, since that’s the anticipated average for next year.

In reality, each loan and lender will have a different interest rate. Additionally, the interest rate may fluctuate depending on your qualifications and DSCR. You can get this information from your lenders to plug into your calculator.

We’ll use three common loans for this example: a 30-year fixed, 40-year fixed, and interest only loan.

If we had a 30-year mortgage for $200,000 at 8%, our monthly payment would be $1,467.

For a 40-year fixed with the same info, payments would be $1,390.

For interest-only, you can calculate the loan fairly simply yourself. Multiply the loan amount by the interest rate (e.g., 200,000 × .08 = 16,000). That gives you the yearly interest, then you divide it by 12 to get the monthly payment. For our example, that’s $1,333.

So what do you do with these numbers? How do you know which loan is best?

It depends on your priorities. To have the most cash flow, the lowest number is best (in this case, interest-only). If you need something that amortizes, a 30-year would probably be best.

But you don’t really know which loan will be best for you until you calculate the DSCR.

How to Calculate the DSCR

Loan LTVs and rates on a DSCR are determined by the debt service coverage ratio itself. Now that we have all our raw information, we can plug it into our DSCR calculation to get the ratio.

Here’s how you get the numbers you need:

Add up your expenses (taxes, insurance, and HOA fees) with each loan’s payment amount. Then divide rent by all those expenses.

Costs + Mortgage = Total Expenses

Rent ÷ Total Expenses = DSCR Ratio

Here’s an example of what it would look like with an example using a $200,000 loan and an 8% interest rate:

We want the DSCR to at least equal 1.

Over 1 is ideal. This is a higher cash flow, and you’ll get a better loan.

Less than 1 means negative cash flow, and means you might have to look at a negative DSCR or a no-ratio loan instead.

<1 = Negative Cash Flow

At 1 = Rent = Expenses

>1 = Positive cash flow

Help with How to Calculate a DSCR Loan

Do you have a deal with a DSCR of 1 or more? Do you need help finding out?

If you have any questions, we’d be glad to help. If you have a deal, we can run the numbers for you. Email us at Info@TheCashFlowCompany.com.

You have choices in the DSCR world. Let us help you find them!

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Could this be the right leverage for your deal? Here’s how to calculate a DSCR loan.

“DSCR” stands for “debt service coverage ratio.” It’s a number that explains cash flow, or money coming in vs money going out.

In a real estate rental situation, there are two important numbers to figure out this ratio:

  1. Income – rent from tenants.
  2. Expenses – mortgage principal and interest, taxes, insurance, and any HOA fees.

What Ratio Do DSCR Lenders Take?

If your income 100% covers your expenses with none left over, that’s a ratio of 1:1. Most DSCR lenders require 1:1 as a standard minimum.

Some lenders will go as low as .75, which is called no ratio. That’s if your income from your rental leaves 25% of the property’s expenses left over. 

But the ideal use of a DSCR loan is when you have a higher ratio. This would mean your rent is higher than your expenses, and your property has positive cash flow.

How Do You Calculate the DSCR?

So now you understand what the ratio is… But how do you calculate your DSCR ratio?

You need the two numbers:

  1. The rent you’ll charge (income)
  2. Mortgage principal and interest, taxes, insurance, and HOA fees (expenses)

Note: utilities and property management costs are not considered expenses on a DSCR loan.

Once you add up your expenses, you have to find out if your rent covers them. To get the ratio number, you divide income by expenses.

DSCR Loan Calculation Example

Here’s a simple example.

Let’s say you have a single-family property, and the interest and mortgage is $1,000/month. Taxes are $250, property insurance is $150, and there are no HOA fees.

Your total monthly expenses adds up to $1,400.

Now let’s say the rent you can charge based on your property’s location is $1,600.

So, you can divide $1,600 (income) by $1,400 (expenses). You get a ratio of 1.14.

A 1:1 ratio (the typical minimum) can also be called 1. So our 1.14 is higher than the minimum. With a ratio higher than one, you’ll have a much better shot at finding a DSCR lender who will work with you.

If the market in our example went up, maybe you could charge $2,000/month for rent. If your expenses were still $1,400, your ratio would be 1.42. With that ratio, you could likely get a bigger loan and lower rate.

The higher your ratio, the better your opportunities for rates and terms. The lender sees it like this: the more income coming into the property, the more guaranteed it is you’ll pay them back.

Using a DSCR Loan Calculator

If you’d rather skip the manual math, you can download our simple, free DSCR loan calculator here.

Read the full article here.

Watch the video here:

https://youtu.be/W7-P0YL_yU0

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Here are the basics of how DSCR loans work for your real estate investment.

Finding the right loan isn’t as easy as it used to be.

We’re getting more and more calls asking about different loans. And the most common loan investors want to know about? DSCR loans.

How are DSCR loans changing in this current market? Where will rates go? Who is still offering them? Is a DSCR loan even still a good option for investors right now?

Let’s go over those answers and see how DSCR loans work in today’s real estate market.

The Basics of How DSCR Loans Work

To begin with, the most important thing to know about DSCR loans right now is that they vary from lender to lender. You need to get to know lenders in your area.

Conventional conforming loans are different – they have one main underwriting guideline all lenders follow. For DSCR loans, every lender creates their own requirements, offers, and processes.

How DSCR Loans Differ

Each lender has their own nuances. Any number of these factors can change for a DSCR loan between different lenders:

  • Ratio requirements
  • Credit score requirements
  • Terms and products (interest-only, 40-year, etc.)
  • Interest rates

Lenders will also have different restrictions for properties, based on:

  • Location
  • Unit size
  • Short-term vs traditional rentals
  • Personal name vs LLC name

To be successful with DSCR loans, you need to become a master of which lenders offer what in your area.

You have to be proactive. Lenders won’t come knocking on your door to let you know what products they have available.

How to Connect with DSCR Lenders

With more investors asking for money and less money available, many lenders are overwhelmed. The best thing you can do is be proactive, educated, and prepared with your lenders.

It’s wise to get someone who can help connect you with lenders and products. A place like The Cash Flow Company can help with this aspect of real estate funding. They can advocate for you to make sure you get the best loan for your deal.

How DSCR Loans Work – What is the “DSCR”?

“DSCR” stands for “debt service coverage ratio.” It’s a number that explains cash flow, or money coming in vs money going out.

In a real estate rental situation, there are two important numbers to figure out this ratio:

  1. Income – rent from tenants.
  2. Expenses – mortgage principal and interest, taxes, insurance, and any HOA fees.

What Debt Service Coverage Ratio Do DSCR Lenders Take?

If your income 100% covers your expenses with none left over, that’s a ratio of 1:1. Most DSCR lenders require 1:1 as a standard minimum.

DSCRs Lower Than 1:1

Some lenders will go as low as .75, which is called no ratio. That’s if your income from your rental leaves 25% of the property’s expenses left over. 

There’s one main circumstance when investors would take a loan with no ratio. If you have a fix-and-flip in a tough spot and need to refinance it into a rental for a short time, a no ratio DSCR loan could make sense.

Making $2,500 rent on a $3,000 per month property is better than spending $3,000 every month for a house that’s just sitting on the market. Some income is better than none.

DSCRs Higher Than 1:1

But the ideal use of a DSCR loan is when you have a higher ratio. This would mean your rent is higher than your expenses, and your property has positive cash flow.

Some lenders require a ratio of 1:2. This requires a much bigger gap between what your tenant pays for the property and what you pay. Hitting this ratio can be unrealistic for many markets. Rents are steadily increasing, but not by that much.

You should verify what ratio lenders use before you even consider closing on a DSCR property. Do your research, learn your lending options, and find out each DSCR lenders’ minimum requirements.

How DSCR Loans Work – How Do You Calculate the DSCR?

So now you understand what the ratio is and how lenders use it… But how do you calculate your DSCR ratio?

You need two numbers:

  1. The rent you’ll charge (income)
  2. Mortgage principal and interest, taxes, insurance, and HOA fees (expenses)

Note: utilities and property management costs are not considered expenses on a DSCR loan.

Once you add up your expenses, you have to find out if your rent covers them. To get the ratio number, you divide income by expenses.

If you don’t want to worry about doing the math yourself, you can download our free DSCR loan calculator at this link.

DSCR Loan Calculation Example

Here’s a simple example.

Let’s say you have a single-family property, and the interest and mortgage is $1,000/month. Taxes are $250, property insurance is $150, and there are no HOA fees.

Your total monthly expenses adds up to $1,400.

Now let’s say the rent you can charge based on your property’s location is $1,600.

So, you can divide $1,600 (income) by $1,400 (expenses). You get a ratio of 1.14.

A 1:1 ratio (the typical minimum) can also be called 1. So our 1.14 is higher than the minimum. With a ratio higher than one, you’ll have a much better shot at finding a DSCR lender who will work with you.

If the market in our example went up, maybe you could charge $2,000/month for rent. If your expenses were still $1,400, your ratio would be 1.42. With that ratio, you could likely get a bigger loan and lower rate.

The higher your ratio, the better your opportunities for rates and terms. The lender sees it like this: the more income coming into the property, the more guaranteed it is you’ll pay them back.

Short-Term Rental Options with DSCR Loans

It’s still possible to use DSCR loans for short-term rental units (like Airbnb or VRBO).

However, the requirements may be different for a short term-rental. You can get your DSCR loan for a short-term rental one of two ways:

  1. You’ll need to have 2+ years of experience with the property, with proof of income for that time. The rental will be treated as “no ratio,” so you’ll get higher rates and lower LTVs.
  2. They’ll go off of market rent of traditional rentals in the area. If the DSCR with that market rent qualifies, you can get a decent loan.

In either case, DSCR loans for short-term rentals don’t count the rent you receive from guests as the income. The ratio has to be calculated using regular rent rates.

Get Someone On Your Team Who Knows How DSCR Loans Work

You may be stepping into unfamiliar waters with this market, unsure of where or how to get investment loans. Yet leverage will still be vital for your real estate career.

The Cash Flow Company searches every day for the best loans for real estate investors.

If you have a DSCR loan or a deal you need a loan for, reach out to us at Info@TheCashFlowCompany.com.

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DSCR Calculation

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An important part of considering a DSCR loan is understanding the DSCR calculation. All lenders will look at this formula for DSCR loans.

Let’s go through and look at the numbers to find out if your property has enough cash flow for a DSCR loan.

Income & Expenses

The number one thing DSCR lenders look at is income.

For this example, let’s say our rent is $1,000 per month.

The next thing they look at is expenses.

They want to make sure your income more than covers your total costs. They’ll look at: mortgage payments, taxes, insurance, and HOA. Right now, they don’t look at property management costs, but that could change in the future.

Let’s fill out these numbers for our example property:

Table. Title: "DSCR Formula." Rent: $1000. An itemized list of expenses totaling $850.

So, the total expenses for this property are $850. Right away, we can see that income more than covers expenses, and this property cash flows $150/month.

Applying the DSCR Formula

Then, the equation lenders will do to determine this cash flow will be:

Income  ÷  Expenses  =  Cash Flow Rate

Or, in this case:

1000  ÷  850  =  1.17+

Lenders are looking for a positive cash flow. They want properties with:

  • Bare minimum: One-to-one. This means your rent at least covers your costs. (Example: Rent is $1000 and your monthly expenses on the property is $1000).
  • Better: 1+
  • Best: 1.25+

Download our free spreadsheet to fill out this formula for your properties to see if they’d qualify for a DSCR loan.

DSCR calculation.

Find out more on how to leverage up your real estate investments on our Youtube channel.

The Cash Flow Company can help you with DSCR loans and all real estate investor loans.

We also can help you find and set up real private money from those around your area.

We scour 100’s of loan programs across the country every month locating the best investor friendly loans.

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